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  • Importance of water when training for a marathon.

    By Tony Sibley, Global Customer Support Manager My colleagues at Aquionics, Berson and Hanovia have been giving me plenty of encouragement and support as I prepare to tackle the daunting challenge of running the London Marathon on April 22nd. Inspired by my wife Amanda’s tremendous efforts last year, I will be dragging myself around the … Continue reading “Importance of water when training for a marathon.”

  • Do you drink Plastic?

    The recently released Orb Media study revealing that around 93% of the bottled water they tested showed ‘some sign of micro plastic contamination’, has seen the bottled water industry and leading producers taking a defensive position.

  • Water Process Flow – More Than Just Gallons Per Minute (gpm)

    There are a several variables that need to be considered when sizing a new UV disinfection system. One of the most obvious variables is the flow rate of the water through the system. However, there is more to a flow rate than just determining a `gallons per minute’ value and plugging that number into a sizing equation.

  • Importance of water when training for a marathon.

    By Tony Sibley, Global Customer Support Manager

    My colleagues at Aquionics, Berson and Hanovia have been giving me plenty of encouragement and support as I prepare to tackle the daunting challenge of running the London Marathon on April 22nd. Inspired by my wife Amanda’s tremendous efforts last year, I will be dragging myself around the 26.2-mile course and raising money for the Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation. As many of my colleagues will know, my dad Tom lost his life to the disease five years ago, and I will be running in his memory. I was amazed by everyone’s generosity last year and I hope that we can equal or even exceed the amount we raised for this very worthy cause.

    Obviously, my health and physical condition will be critical to me completing the course and challenging Mo Farah. OK, maybe not the latter, but even fun runners such as myself need to be well prepared. During the final weeks of training for the event, the way in which I have been fuelling my body has therefore become ever more important. Although the 20-mile training runs, which burn more than 3,000 calories, provide plenty of scope in terms of what I can consume, I have been eating mainly protein-rich foods such as chicken, turkey and fish. These are accompanied by some good green vegetables, sweet potato and salads. My normal diet doesn’t usually include a lot of carbohydrates, so I haven’t had to make any changes there in the run-up to the marathon.

    Another thing that doesn’t change is the need to remain well hydrated. As you are probably aware, our bodies are nearly two-thirds water, so it is crucial to consume enough fluids to stay hydrated and healthy. Failure to drink enough fluids can lead to feeling tired, getting headaches and underperforming. ‘Fluids’ not only includes tap or bottled water, but also other drinks such as tea, coffee, milk, fruit juices and soft drinks. We also absorb water from the food we eat, which on average provides about 20% of our total fluid intake.

    The amount of fluid we need to drink depends on many things, including the weather, how much physical activity we do and our age. However, the Eatwell Guide suggests drinking six to eight glasses of fluid per day, which is on top of the water provided by the food we eat. As part of my preparation I am drinking a pint of milk after every run because it has a high protein content and is good for muscle recovery. Aside from protein shakes, everything else is all about water, as there is nothing better for hydrating the body and keeping me in the best possible condition.

    The condition of the food and drink I consume is something I take very seriously. When drinking water, milk or soft drinks, most people wouldn’t give its production process a second thought; they will simply take it for granted that it is fine to drink. However, because of my job at Hanovia, I am acutely aware of the standards, processes and technologies in place to ensure fluids are safe for human consumption. For example, tap water and the water used in the production of food and beverages goes through a rigorous treatment process to prevent contamination ever reaching the consumer.

    Water contaminants fall into four basic categories – aesthetic, biological, chemical and dissolved solids – and contamination can come from three primary sources:

    • Rainwater – Although usually safe to drink, rainwater has become increasingly contaminated due to air pollution in various parts of the world.
    • Surface water – Storm water run-off can pollute rivers, streams and lakes, and much of the contamination comes from agriculture and industry.
    • Groundwater – Water from underground aquifers is usually safe to drink, but over the past few years contamination has increased. Water that is deep underground is more protected from many types of contamination. Geology and soil make-up also affect water quality. Groundwater may be contaminated by naturally occurring elements like arsenic, selenium or boron.

    Because of these contamination risks, if water is not properly treated or disinfected it can pose a serious health threat to anyone who drinks it. If I became ill now from drinking poor quality water, that would be my marathon ruined. These health risks make water treatment incredibly important, and advanced modern UV technology provides the best non-chemical disinfection solution for ensuring process water is free from harmful microorganisms and is safe to use in production of high-quality food and drinks.

    So please remember to always keep yourself properly hydrated – whether you’re preparing for an endurance race, or just as part of your normal daily routine. And with treatment technology such as UV ensuring our water’s high quality, we can happily keep on drinking it without having to worry about its safety.

    ● If you would like to support my fundraising effort for the Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation, please visit my JustGiving page at www.justgiving.com/fundraising/tony-sibley2

  • Do you drink Plastic?

    The recently released Orb Media study revealing that around 93% of the bottled water they tested showed ‘some sign of micro plastic contamination’, has seen the bottled water industry and leading producers taking a defensive position.

    By Dan Shaver.

    The recently released  Orb Media study revealing that around 93% of the bottled water they tested showed ‘some sign of micro plastic contamination’, has seen the bottled water industry and leading producers taking a defensive position.

    The study examined a total of 259 bottles of water from nine countries and 11 different brands, including water from both glass and plastic containers provided by the same source. The test involved a fluorescent dye,  that attaches itself to polymeric material, to highlight  particles >100 um (the diameter of a human hair). .

    The International Bottled Water Association (IBWA) and several major  producers responded to the study, saying that, `while micro plastic is an emerging issue and a concern, the study has a number of issues, was not peer reviewed and took preconceived positions on issues’.

    Micro plastics are just one concern that the likes of Danone, Coca-Cola, Nestle and PepsiCo deal with when producing products. These companies work to  some of the most stringent quality standards in the food and beverage industry, and the water they use in their drinks is subject to multi-step filtration and disinfection processes prior to production.

    These are highly engineered water quality delivery systems, that are not just to ensure control of the internal contaminants that could enter the production process, such as those described in the Orb Media study, but also to thwart contaminants that could enter from external sources.

    Many beverage-producing facilities receive water destined for use in final products just in the same way as you and I do – from a municipal water source. Municipal water facilities are subject to a stringent treatment regime to ensure public safety, however that does not mean the processes in place are foolproof. Water treatment plants can have equipment malfunctions, water main breaks, algae blooms and a host of events that can lead to the possibility of contamination and the introduction of waterborne diseases.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared waterborne disease to be the world’s leading killer, with some 3.4 million people dying each year as a result of water related diseases.

    Some may think that the United States is immune from these issues, but in 2013-14 the CDC (Centres for Disease Control and Prevention) reported there were 42 drinking-water-associated outbreaks in the US caused by infectious pathogens, chemicals or toxins. Of those 42 outbreaks, there were 1,006 cases of illness, 124 hospitalizations and 13 deaths. The problem also appears to be increasing, with the number of reported incidents in that period increasing from the 32 outbreaks in 2011-12.

    All 13 deaths in 2012-14 were due to legionella.

    Another surprising statistic is that 75% of the 1,006 cases were linked to community water systems, which are government-regulated. The CDC report revealed that cryptosporidium or crypto, a parasite that causes a diarrheal illness, caused five of the outbreaks, whilst giardia, another parasite responsible for diarrheal illness, caused three further outbreaks.

    Among those incidents classified as `environmental exposure outbreaks’, eight involved human-made systems, such as cooling towers and decorative fountains.

    Many industry experts feel the number of cases will rise significantly due to underground water pipes nearing the end or being well past their estimated life span. The American Society of Civil Engineers estimates that there are roughly 240,000 water main breaks every year and according to the American Water Works, 44 percent of America’s water infrastructure is considered as being poor.

    While Orb Media state in their report that “scientists don’t really know yet” what impact plastic particles have on our health, it is an area of concern for beverage producers, the IBWA and WHO. This emerging concern about exposing consumers to plastic on a daily basis, coupled with the already faltering water infrastructure, raises questions as to what more can be done and how quickly solutions can be put in place? Until then it falls to the general public to ask questions, demand answers and insist that anything we consume is properly treated using the most advanced filtration and disinfection methods.

    The full Orb Media study can be found at https://orbmedia.org/stories/plus-plastic.

     

  • Water Process Flow – More Than Just Gallons Per Minute (gpm)

    There are a several variables that need to be considered when sizing a new UV disinfection system. One of the most obvious variables is the flow rate of the water through the system. However, there is more to a flow rate than just determining a `gallons per minute’ value and plugging that number into a sizing equation.

    By Dan Shaver

    There are a several variables that need to be considered when sizing a new UV disinfection system. One of the most obvious variables is the flow rate of the water through the system. However, there is more to a flow rate than just determining a `gallons per minute’ value and plugging that number into a sizing equation.

    That is most certainly the case for UV system installations within industrial processes. For these applications several additional questions about the flow rate should be asked. This is especially true for UV systems that use medium pressure lamp technology. This type of UV lamp generates heat and this can have a direct impact on the production process. Ignoring the heat generated by these lamps can result in the UV system overheating. This will cause the UV system to shut down, which will stop the water treatment and reduce the availability of treated water for use in the production process or final product. In addition, inadequate heat dissipation can also lead to internal damage of the UV system itself.

    When a medium pressure UV system is being considered, the type of questions to be asked about flow rate should include:

    • Is the treated water used within a batch production process, with water required on-demand? Or is the water flow continuous while production takes place?
    • If the treated water is part of a batch process (shutting down between batches), how frequently does this happen and how long is flow stopped?
    • Is the water in an open or closed loop production process?

    If the facility has an open loop production process, where the flow is continuous, a flow rate of 2 gpm (0.5 m³/h) per kW of UV lamp power would be adequate for heat dissipation in the water treatment process line. For example, if a UV system outputs a total of 10 kW of power, then a minimum flow rate of 20 gpm (2 x 10kW) should be maintained in the open loop process at all times to avoid overheating of the UV system.

    If the facility operates a batch water treatment process, where flow through the UV system may be stopped periodically, a closed loop recirculation line may be required. For a closed loop scenario, where there is no other means of heat dissipation, the same minimum flow calculation is still required, but other variables are now added to the equation. These variables are: the total volume of water in the closed loop and the length of time that the flow is stopped. In this situation, a minimum volume of 13 gallons of water is required for every kWh of lamp power output. For example, if the water flow is expected to stop for 2 hours, a UV system with 10 kW of output power would require a minimum total volume in the closed loop of 260 gallons (13 x 10 kW x 2 hours).

    In reality, due to budget limitations or physical space constraints, not every facility has the ability to add a recirculation loop to their process line. In this case, bleeding water from the UV system and sending this to drain or back to be re-used in another process could be a practical alternative.

    Given that manufacturers are very concerned about plant downtime, potentially caused by inadequate heat dissipation from medium pressure UV lamps, it is important that these flow calculations are understood when planning the installation of a new UV system. When a UV system is being sized, understanding water flow conditions beyond the `gallons per minute’ value is essential to ensure the UV system operates safely and the availability of treated water for production is not compromised.

  • Why is UV water treatment technology a growing market?

    Come and visit us in Dubai on the 28th Feb 2018, where at the ‘Drink technology Expo’

    Come and visit us in Dubai on the 28th Feb 2018, where at the ‘Drink technology Expo’ Matthias Boeker (EMEA Sales Manager) will be presenting an introduction to UV technology. Understand why the market is forecasted to grow 11% CAGR from 2015 to 2020 and how application such as beverage manufacturing can benefit in adding UV to their process.

    Watch our vblog below for a preview:

    Contact our  GCC partners ‘Water technology Engineering’ to find out more about our product range: info@wet-fzc.com

    Look forward in seeing you there.

  • How is the Asia Pacific Food & Beverage market taking to UV water treatment technology?

    The Asia Pacific (AP) region (outside of China and India) includes some of the fastest growing economies in the world. With rising incomes and continued population growth, demand for food and beverage products continues to rise. Coinciding with an increase in demand is a rise in manufacturing standards and quality levels.

    By Poorna Rajendran – AP Regional Manager

    The Asia Pacific (AP) region (outside of China and India) includes some of the fastest growing economies in the world. With rising incomes and continued population growth, demand for food and beverage products continues to rise. Coinciding with an increase in demand is a rise in manufacturing standards and quality levels.

    To support this, many of the food and beverage brands produced in the AP region (for both local and global consumption) continue to improve their water treatment processes. This ensures they comply with the stringent health and safety regulations, address rising health consciousness of the consumers and eliminate contamination risks that could lead to product recalls.

    UV disinfection technology is one beneficiary of these improvements and by 2020 the UV equipment market is estimated to be worth $27m USD, with a forecasted 12.5% CAGR since 2015. Food and beverage manufacturing is the largest market for UV equipment, which not only includes water treatment, but also air and surface treatment.

    Improved water treatment is the key driver for UV market growth. Water is a key ingredient in the food and beverage manufacturing process and its integrity is essential to manufacturers looking to maintain quality, consistency, maximise operation efficiency and, ultimately, protect their brand and maximise profitability.

    Food and beverage manufacturing concern:

    There are currently a number of Asian Pacific food and beverage manufacturers concerned about the conventional UV systems installed in their facilities because they fail to provide the necessary control of disinfection performance. Some of these systems have been installed without an UV sensor to measure the intensity and/or fail to provide the absolute dose in ‘mJ/cm2’ on the control panel display. The UV dose is in fact the most important value to the user because it provides the energy required for efficient and effective process water disinfection.

    See below pictures of some conventional UV systems:

    The importance of dose:

    Before sizing a UV system for a specific application there is a need to identify the log reduction required for a target microorganism. This will enable an accurate dose to be applied. However, before the UV dose is calculated, other key parameters must be understood. To work out the correct UV dose required, ‘intensity’, measured in mW/cm2, must be multiplied by the time the water is exposed to UV light in the chamber. This can be established from the flow rate, which is measured in m3/hr.

    (Dose = Intensity x Time).

    So, let’s have a look at these parameters in more detail:

    • Dose – This is the ultimate parameter that needs to be displayed on the UV system panel, providing the operator insurance that the required dose is being delivered. Whatever the target microorganism is, a certain log reduction must be achieved. For example, if the application is targeting a 4-log reduction of ‘cryptosporidium’, the system is looking to achieve a 99.99% reduction. If it is a 3-log reduction, then it would be a 99.9% reduction. Every microorganism has varied sensitivity levels, but to increase from a 3 to 4 -log reduction often requires a lot more additional energy than you would need to move from a 2 to a 3-log reduction. The increase in energy required is never linear.
    • Intensity – The light energy transmitted through the process water in the chamber from the lamp is measured on the wall of the chamber. This provides the first parameter to work out dose, as per the equation ‘Dose = Intensity x Time’. However, the UV transmittance of the water must be carefully considered, as it can vary. This is known as UVT and is shown as a percentage. The lower the UVT value, the lower the intensity reading, because there are more organics in the water absorbing the light. To read about UVT, click here.
    • Time – Every plant will have a specific flow rate into the UV chamber and this needs to be known as it will determine how long the water will be in contact with the UV light. Throughout a chamber the flow rate is never the same and there will be slow tracks and faster tracks that receive less exposure time. This needs to be measured using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software and will provide the last key parameter to calculate the required UV dose.

    The UV system standard:

    Hanovia has supplied UV systems in the AP region for several decades. These systems are used by bottled water plants, carbonated soft drinks manufacturers, breweries and dairy industries as a firewall for source water protection and post treatment after carbon, reverse osmosis and other filtration methods.

    Hanovia can assure bio-security for food and beverage product manufacturers because its UV systems are optimized for the specific intended application.

    • Hanovia will recommend a UV dose, measured in mJ/cm2, based on a comprehensive review of the customer’s application.
    • Whether a low pressure or medium pressure UV system is to be installed, the system must incorporate an intensity sensor.
    • To maintain optimum performance, an auto wiper is required to clean the quartz sleeve shielding the lamp. This allows for maximum intensity to be transmitted.
    • The UV system control panel provides a real-time display of an absolute dose (mJ/cm2) that allows the operator to measure and control the performance of the UV disinfection system.
      • A good aftermarket support plan, such as the Hanovia UV Care program, is required to provide users with a periodic audit, UV sensor re-calibration, traceability and documentation.
      • To have complete confidence of biosecurity, a third-party validation certificate from an USEPA or DVGW independent testing body will guarantee the disinfection performance of the UV system. The Hanovia PureLine ‘Performance Qualified’ (PQ) range has been validated in accordance with USEPA and the UVDGM (2006) protocols

       

      If you would like further information on UV disinfection systems and the required parameters for sizing a system for your application, please contact the Hanovia AP office in Singapore or the Asia head office in Shanghai. The Hanovia UVCare program is available to support customers in the region. Hanovia support is structured into three tiers. Tier 1 support is provided by Hanovia’s local partners, who are all fully trained and certified. These are backed by Tier 2 support provided by the Hanovia teams in Singapore and Shanghai offices. Tier 3 consists of Hanovia’s unique research and development service, located in our innovation centre in the UK.

     

  • China food and beverage industry is recognising the benefits of UV solutions

    The market for ultraviolet (UV) treatment equipment in the Asia Pacific food and beverage industry is both lucrative and fast-growing. It was worth USD 15 million in 2015, and that figure is predicted to have increased by 12.5% by 2020. This growth is mainly driven by increased manufacturing activity in the region, especially in China.

    By Helen Zhang

    The market for ultraviolet (UV) treatment equipment in the Asia Pacific food and beverage industry is both lucrative and fast-growing. It was worth USD 15 million in 2015, and that figure is predicted to have increased by 12.5% by 2020. This growth is mainly driven by increased manufacturing activity in the region, especially in China. Local and global food and beverage producers have also driven enhancements in water treatment processes, and this has seen UV technology being recognised as an effective non-chemical solution.

    UV is a physical, green treatment method, which utilises the DNA-destroying features of the 240-280 nm UVC spectrum to realise on-line and non-residual disinfection. Various contemporary disinfection methods are employed within the industry, but the use of UV technology is becoming increasingly widespread.

    In the bottled water and mineral water industries, there is an increasing requirement for green, non-residual and natural potable products. Chlorination has long been the most common method of water purification, but research has exposed problems with the disinfection by-products (DBPs) produced by this method. China has severe regulatory limits on both the DBPs caused by chlorination, and the bromate produced by ozone disinfection. This is driving the growing rate of conversion to other disinfection methods such as UV, which does not produce any DBPs.

    In the beverage and milk industries, it is not merely the final product disinfection that is important for manufacturers, but microbial control in the whole process line. A UV system upstream of a reverse osmosis (RO) system can prevent the RO membrane from microbial pollution and prolong its lifespan. And according to the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance (PMO) requirements of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), UV disinfection is certified as having the same effect as pasteurization, but with much less energy consumption and operating costs.

    There is a wide range of applications for UV technology in the brewing industry, such as syrups, deaerated diluting water, and clean-in-place (CIP) rinse water disinfection. UV can efficiently kill spores and thermophilic bacteria in syrups, offering a much more energy-efficient solution compared to thermisation. In the water treatment process line, UV systems enable the reduction of both chemical dosage and its DBPs risk.

    In summary, UV disinfection is becoming more widespread in the food and beverage industry because it has low energy consumption, simple operation and maintenance, and is free of chemicals. Hanovia is dedicated to investing in high-tech UV technology and developing fresh applications in which the benefits of UV solutions can be delivered.

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